It has been a while……………

Spring peak has arrived and Summer is just around the corner too, as the birds are singing, the bees are buzzing, the trees are leafing and this blog is…… well desperate for content if truth be told.

Fear not, anybody who knows me will realise that I am still active over on Facebook and I haven’t disappeared into the oblivion, take today’s Facebook Naturestimeline cover update below, for instance.

And then there is the original, unedited, uncropped version (beware, large upload) for all my fellow nature lovers to admire.

 

Song Thrush in the garden, sitting atop a wheelbarrow
Song Thrush in the garden, sitting atop a wheelbarrow

 

Isn’t he or she a beauty eh! My advice to you is, should one need a boost for their wellbeing, just listen intently to birds such as the one shown above, singing lustily away at dawn or dusk amongst a cacophony of other birdsound. Of course, there are times when they’re not over vocal as when raising their own family, it is best to be quieter then as noisy adults make for noisy children, you know. As for my own voice, it can often be heard over on LinkedIn. I  like to participate in various LinkedIn Group discussions over there or simply make worthwhile connections with fellow naturalists and conservation professionals as the more the merrier, the bigger the conservation movement. I am an occasional Google+ community user as is evidenced by the badges on this page as well, of course.

So finally, it is time for a request. Wherever you find yourself loitering about online, do please let us know. As you are my audience, therefore we should get connected and continue to fight our fight together, for the good of the Natural World.

 

More, next time.

 

 

naturestimeline Media/News/Publishing “A conservation professional sharing his personal perspective on breaking news stories from the world of nature alongside his own accounts from the field.”

and

The images you may well have missed

Knowing that not everyone is on Facebook, here is the latest naturestimeline imagery in all its glory or not, as the case may be.

A lightning bolt captured on film, look carefully towards the Left Hand side.
FOR THOSE NOT ON FACEBOOK – A lightning bolt captured on film, look carefully towards the Left Hand side slightly above the overhead wires.
A photo FAIL. This image is more representative of my efforts in capturing a lightning bolt.
FOR THOSE NOT ON FACEBOOK – A photo FAIL. This image is more representative of my efforts in capturing a lightning bolt.
A Silver-washed Fritillary butterfly - the valesina subspecies.
FOR THOSE NOT ON FACEBOOK – A Silver-washed Fritillary butterfly – the valesina subspecies.
naturestimeline Media/News/Publishing “A conservation professional sharing his personal perspective on breaking news stories from the world of nature alongside his own accounts from the field.”

#photography

#nature

#weather

#thunderstorms

#butterflies

and

A naturestimeline Facebook page production – some further randomness

A naturestimeline Facebook page production – some further randomness

http://ow.ly/APse7

Wow, having looked back through some recent photographs, I can’t believe I’ve managed to capture this. After all, I am a truly amateur photographer unlike some.

Look towards the middle left portion of the first image and just above the telegraph wires, a lightning bolt is revealed. More usually my captures end up like the following image (click on link for full-sized image).

http://ow.ly/i/6F0DL

And when it wasn’t raining over recent weeks, a walk in a local private woodland managed for pheasant shooting revealed this beautiful creature, a Silver-washed Fritillary butterfly. Again, click on link for full-sized image.

http://ow.ly/i/6F0Ed

Kind Regards

Tony Powell

naturestimeline Media/News/Publishing “A conservation professional sharing his personal perspective on breaking news stories from the world of nature alongside his own accounts from the field.”

#photography
#nature
#weather
#thunderstorms
#butterflies

and

Moving towards a better future for our wildlife

Occasionally there comes a time to reflect on past knowledge of a subject and then to test it further as new evidence comes to light, some months or years later. I’m not having a Google “Right to be forgotten” moment, but it could be suggested that most people will on occasion, make a judgement quite naturally or unnaturally with or without intent and then upon reflection, realise they were misguided on a certain topic. This would of course simply be human nature and I guess we all need to accept this fact as new thoughts and ideas come to the fore. We are often told to assess the past, in order guide our future prospects. At risk of rambling, where exactly am I going with all this?

Well, could it be that these same thought processes, applied to our relationships, career prospects, friendships etc. might actually also apply in a debate about nature conservation? If I also put it to you, that our country’s wildlife future is in your hands, could you as an individual truly make a difference?

Let me now remind you of two naturestimeline postings from a year ago (click on the links to access original content) which once again poses the age old question of how best to conserve this nation’s wildlife.

Do we need a change of direction?

Or perhaps a new holistic approach to effective conservation practice?

 

So with yet still unanswered questions and *in light of many of the latest incentives coming out of the scientific community approach to nature conservation, are we now making the right kind of progress for our non-human inhabitants of this good earth at last?

naturestimeline Media/News/Publishing “A conservation professional sharing his personal perspective on breaking news stories from the world of nature alongside his own accounts from the field.”

*https://www.facebook.com/naturestimeline/posts/697195477005565, http://www.gwct.org.uk/news/news/2014/may/20140516/, http://butterfly-conservation.org/48-5124/relief-road-proves-butterfly-hit-.html

#conservation

#education

#wildlife

#science

#society

and

Getting out and about at Farm Fest 2014

Naturestimeline hasn’t ceased to be, in spite of what some might wish or hope for and on the outside chance that you may have missed me, I’ve had PC issues and well, I’m back.

On the 12th July, I was out and about supporting a local farming enterprise recently, hence the post title* *click on the underlined link for further information regarding the Farm Fest event. Nature and farming practices are inextricably linked so I found this day out, particularly enthralling. As a farmland bird researcher, it is crucial that I continue to learn the link between farmland practices and its effect on the sadly often declining farmland bird species**

Below are some of my own pictures of the event, which is one of many that each and every one of us can attend, so search out an event near you.

The route into Farm Fest 2014 at Parsonage Farm, Andover
The route into Farm Fest 2014 at Parsonage Farm, Andover
Farm Fest 2014 at Parsonage Farm in progress
Farm Fest 2014 at Parsonage Farm in progress
Some of the farm buildings at Farm Fest 2014, held at Parsonage Farm, Andover
Some of the farm buildings at Farm Fest 2014, held at Parsonage Farm, Andover

Just to add, I have no personal involvement with the farm in question but I do hugely value the farming community. I did however, get to taste some local brews once I had returned home.

Some of Upham Brewery's finest Ales
Some of Upham Brewery’s finest Ales

Let us not forget that even the brewing process of Ales or whatever happens to be your tipple requires a little help from Mother Nature, so much respect to her.

Cheers

and

** unless perhaps you’re born a generalist species such as a Jackdaw or Woodpigeon, whose numbers take up the bulk of available farmland bird food biomass

A naturestimeline Facebook page production – Snail pictures!

As stated, some photographic captures from my bird research activities from recent years. Should I receive welcoming feedback, more images will follow over the coming weeks and months.

Please click of the link below to see the relevant imagery and commentary on this and past debates.

 

http://ow.ly/xUQwC

#research
#wildlife
#nature
#snails
#naturestimeline

and

January and February datasets

As promised, how is the phenology looking against a backdrop of a very wet but reasonably mild Winter. One notable thing for me were the number of Thunder days, four in total, all of which occurred before the 16th January. This is quite exceptional under any circumstances and as a consequence there is a notable shift towards earlier day numbers.

1st Thunder day (locally) in date order as of 2014
1st Thunder day (locally) in date order as of 2014
2nd Thunder day (locally) in date order as of 2014
2nd Thunder day (locally) in date order as of 2014
3rd Thunder day (locally) in date order as of 2014
3rd Thunder day (locally) in date order as of 2014
4th Thunder day (locally) in date order as of 2014
4th Thunder day (locally) in date order as of 2014

Now onto the flowering plant and shrub species. The flowering plant species witnessed for the first time in Winter were Woodland Snowdrop, Winter Aconite, Daffodil (cultivated type), Primrose and Lesser Celandine. The flowering shrub species were the Hazel with its catkins and the Blackthorn in blossom.

First flowering Woodland Snowdrop (locally) in date order as of 2014
First flowering Woodland Snowdrop (locally) in date order as of 2014
First flowering Winter Aconite (locally) in date order as of 2014
First flowering Winter Aconite (locally) in date order as of 2014
First flowering Daffodil cultivar (locally) as of 2014
First flowering Daffodil cultivar (locally) as of 2014
First flowering Primrose (locally) as of 2014
First flowering Primrose (locally) as of 2014
First flowering Lesser Celandine (locally) in date order as of 2014
First flowering Lesser Celandine (locally) in date order as of 2014
First flowering Hazel (locally) as of 2014
First flowering Hazel (locally) as of 2014
First flowering Blackthorn (locally) as of 2014
First flowering Blackthorn (locally) as of 2014

Several of the above events are generally regarded as not suitable for accurate phenological tracking by certain well-known naturalists, can you guess which ones?

Two insect species were seen on the wing for the first time before the end of February and these were the first Bumblebee, presumably of the genus bombus terrestris as well as Brimstone butterfly. Below are the respective day numbers and rolling averages over a succession of years for those seasonal treats.

Bumblebee (locally) as of 2014
Bumblebee (locally) as of 2014
Brimstone butterfly (locally) as of 2014
Brimstone butterfly (locally) as of 2014

There were some other bird related sightings occurring for the first time this year, some of which will be apparent when looking at MY NATURAL EVENTS CALENDAR. I hope to blog about these over at ukbirdingtimeline soon, in the meanwhile, I will leave you to ponder any determinable trends in the data alongside some images of the above phenomena.

Blackthorn flowering
Blackthorn flowering
Bumblebee species
Bumblebee species
Hazel catkins flowering
Hazel catkins flowering

Click on the following underlined links in the blue text for other folk’s images of Primrose and Lesser Celandine in this previous posting.

Best Wishes and more updates soon

*the warmer start to March has accelerated some events yet further, keep watch on the events calendar for updates

and