Newbury, Berkshire RG14 6HL info@naturestimeline.com Always available, except when sleeping, or on a rare away day. I will attempt to respond to most emails within 24 hours.

I’m not the only one

I am glad I am not the only one. The following reblog speaks of the role of Citizen Science from the viewpoint of a Nature's Calendar Researcher. Citizen science data: addressing important questions on the future of UK woods and trees. Should anybody be interested in my records, they are accessible via the link shown below. here Posted by: … Continue reading I’m not the only one

Sort your life out……………………………………

Naturestimeline is back, I hear you gasp. Cue rapturous applause................................ Where has our venerable host been and why were there no updates! Well, sometimes life's chores tend to overwhelm but hell; I am not to be defeated by what seems a never-ending list of tasks. Besides, I have a responsibility, as a blogger to inform and … Continue reading Sort your life out……………………………………

Baby birds galore

My regular readers will know that I painstakingly (too strong an emotive really) update my phenology calendar to reflect on the natural events taking place in the United Kingdom. So, now that the mixed spring has passed, what effect did it have on nature, more especially our familiar breeding garden birds? When it comes to young birds, … Continue reading Baby birds galore

The vital role of citizen science

The best way to observe nature is to follow the changing seasons. I subscribe to many blogs, of which the Woodland Trust is one. Their latest post reblogged above, illustrates how many folk are becoming highly valued citizen scientists.

Woodland Matters

For the past 14 years, enthusiastic volunteers have been helping track changes in seasonal natural events through Nature’s Calendar, adding thousands of records to the UK Phenology Network database. Faithfully, they have observed and recorded when trees come into leaf or flower in spring, when migrant birds arrive and leave, and have spent their autumn days noting when leaves change colour, then fall, or when fruit ripens. The data is being used by students and scientists across the UK, and even further afield, to research the implications of climate change for our natural world.

These recorders are part of a tradition that goes back much further, starting with Robert Marsham, who began recording his ‘Indications of Spring’ back in 1736 on his family estate near Norwich, Norfolk, and continued to record for 62 years. From 1875 until 1947 the Royal Meteorological Society co-ordinated a nation-wide network of recorders…

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Bird Surveys, ill health and horrendous weather

Why the hiatus, I hear you ask. Well, let me explain if I may. My current job role as a Bird Surveyor/Researcher allows me to intimately follow our feathered friends and log their breeding success. To best illustrate the differing roles out there, I will direct you to a couple of blogs. For example, Lewis Yates, whose exploits this birding season come from … Continue reading Bird Surveys, ill health and horrendous weather

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