A naturestimeline Facebook page production – Snail pictures!

As stated, some photographic captures from my bird research activities from recent years. Should I receive welcoming feedback, more images will follow over the coming weeks and months. Please click of the link below to see the relevant imagery and commentary on this and past debates.   http://ow.ly/xUQwC #research #wildlife #nature #snails #naturestimeline Posted by:... Continue Reading →

Inspiring the next generation – a random post

Why not inspire the next generation to care about our natural environment by participating in citizen science. In doing so, you can provide a data source of immense value and it truly is fun. http://ow.ly/tFQo6 #science #nature #citizenscience #birds #education There are so many options out there, get searching for citizen science projects you can... Continue Reading →

Bird Science as a career

#science
#birds
#birding
#education
#youth

UKbirdingtimeline

It is about time this blog received some input, the birding element is actually a huge part of my current career activities. In fact, I’ve been a birder and general naturalist for more years than I care to remember. However, in recent times, I have matured into a more inquisitive individual, always on the search for answers to nature’s riddles.

A fascinating article I recently read was in Animal Conservation from The Zoological Society of London entitled “How can quantitative ecology be attractive to young scientists? Balancing computer/desk work with fieldwork**

*official doi is listed at the bottom of this post, however you can view here for full free access to the above article

Well, I can proudly say I am a keen advocate of both. The recent Bird Atlas is a fine example of data gathering at its very best. Bird Atlas 2007-2011 contained some 19 million observations of 502 bird…

View original post 217 more words

Bird Science as a career

UKbirdingtimeline

It is about time this blog received some input, the birding element is actually a huge part of my current career activities. In fact, I’ve been a birder and general naturalist for more years than I care to remember. However, in recent times, I have matured into a more inquisitive individual, always on the search for answers to nature’s riddles.

A fascinating article I recently read was in Animal Conservation from The Zoological Society of London entitled “How can quantitative ecology be attractive to young scientists? Balancing computer/desk work with fieldwork**

*official doi is listed at the bottom of this post, however you can view here for full free access to the above article

Well, I can proudly say I am a keen advocate of both. The recent Bird Atlas is a fine example of data gathering at its very best. Bird Atlas 2007-2011 contained some 19 million observations of 502 bird…

View original post 217 more words

A WordPress.com Website.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: