Tag Archives: Birding

You never stop learning!

You never stop learning, well I also never stop undertaking my own research or following that of others. This post is a very brief one and perhaps I should entitle it “The research continues”.

Below is a replicated screen grab of my 2400th uploaded Evernote note as uploaded into Trello. I simply thought I would share it with you.

 

Evernote note number 2400 uploaded onto Trello

 

Not much blogging of late as I’ve been otherwise engaged in my freelancing activities. However, I’m always on the search for more work so please get in touch if I can help your business out in any way. For instance, I’m currently engaged in a few bird surveying projects in Southern and Central parts of the UK but I’m always on the look out for more.

Speaking of which, let’s have some record shots of some of those young birds which might just be in your backyard at the current time.

P1000031

A recently fledged Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

P1000117

A juvenile Blackbird (Turdus merula)

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A group of partially hidden juvenile Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)

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Juvenile Starlings in the Birdbath

 

As ever, I’d also be eternally grateful if you could kindly support my pages on Facebook, where I can be found under the name of naturestimeline and naturestimeline StandUp4Nature.

 

 

naturestimeline Education services – “A conservation professional sharing his personal perspective on breaking news stories from the world of nature alongside his own accounts from the field.”

and

Ongoing Research – slowly building up the knowledge base!

For those who might have missed this, I’ll reblog this article here. On my way to fulfilling my mission statement. “birding through the seasons, why birds matter and how to conserve them”.

UKbirdingtimeline

As of this afternoon, I have completed a first stage of many by documenting my scanned (poorly) handwritten notes for a personal research project I have in mind. An example from one of the 184 notes I have uploaded in recent days is shown below.

*be prepared for a geek moment

Doxie 0240 example - Yellow Wagtail 1 Doxie scanned example of handwritten notes – Yellow Wagtail 1

I have also tagged them within Evernote with various wordings for later referencing. For those of you who don’t know what Evernote is, it is a digital note-taking software package and is available with both offline and online versions. Below is an example screen grab of my current Evernote setup for the purposes of this Bird Research Project.

Evernote setup screen grab example - Yellow Wagtail 1 Evernote setup screen grab example – Yellow Wagtail 1

I may eventually try to find a way of incorporating this growing evidence base of notes of viable conservation measures onto 

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Wildlife Conservation – complex and controversial? Assessing the naturestimeline poll findings

I apologise for the inactivity surrounding this particular Blog and without further ado, I will attempt to address the poll’s results.

Firstly, as an aspiring conservation professional, I produced the poll, solely for the reason that I believed it would be a unique way to engage with my readership. Judging by the responses I received, it seems to have worked. Now, after the participation, there is the analysis. For me, the Blog header, says it all. Understandably, being that Wildlife Conservation is complicated, the poll results, as you can see, are mixed.

Attempting to break things down a little, one can find that just over 50 per cent of voters, believed that processes of Habitat loss and Habitat mismanagement were key reasons behind wildlife/biodiversity decline. According to my pollsters, intriguingly, ecological imbalances between the Prey and Predator and the processes of Climate Change were deemed to have minimal impact on the state of our wider environment. Prior to other’s involvement, my view, on which I voted accordingly, was that Climate Change and Predation issues were key indicators driving wildlife declines.

Moving on then, you may ask what do the poll findings prove and where can we take things from here? Here are some of my evolving objectives for this Blog, whilst keeping wildlife observation as a central theme.

  • I want to be able to find answers to everyday questions about Wildlife Conservation practice!
  • Based on the current scientific evidence, what can be done to improve Wildlife Conservation?
  • Are we collaborating enough with other parties
  • Are we utilising the evidence base, when making decisions at a local level?
  • Is there one key message** which could be taken from the poll which could serve to halt the declines in biodiversity?

As a Birding Professional who is keenly awaiting his copy of the 2007 to 2011 United Kingdom Breeding Bird Atlas to drop through his door, I’ll finish this post with a quote* from the 1988 to 1991 Atlas.

Breeding Bird Atlas for the British Isles 1988-1991 front cover

Breeding Bird Atlas for the British Isles 1988-1991 front cover

Courtesy of HRH the Duke of Edinburgh

Quite apart from the influence of human activities, nature is a dynamic process and the success of species has always depended on a number of natural variables, including climatic conditions throughout the year and the relative abundance of prey and predators

**Even twenty years ago, looking for answers on an effective way of managing habitats for wildlife, it was complicated. I just hope we are progressing on the right path now, as we look ahead a further twenty years.**


Google+naturestimeline – courtesy of Tony William Powell