Encouraging better care of the environment

Newbury Weekly News article scan 20/04/17 – Country Matters (Andrew Davis) – Click on the image for a better close-up.

A number of my clients, in fact, the vast majority can probably be classed as Stewards of the landscape. The scanned copy headline as taken from my local newspaper, the Newbury Weekly News back on April 20th this year, talks about an uncertain future for farming post-Brexit but from somewhat of a positive viewpoint (pleasing to see). More broadly, it speaks of what Brexit might mean for the Agricultural sector and its subsequent management (i.e. environmental stewardship) of the UK countryside as a whole. Collaborative approaches such as river catchment conservation projects, farmer clusters and farming/science-led directives will all help guide our way in future and I’m sure will be getting deservedly media attention as a result. The article replicated below taken from the very same newspaper cutting is from Nicola Chester and speaks of the yearly differences she witnesses on her patch (North Wessex Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty*) and the need to assess such changes.

 

Newbury Weekly News article scan 20/04/17 – NATURE NOTES (Nicola Chester) – Click on the image for a better close-up.

 

Speaking of assessments or continual monitoring as we should perhaps name it, I am dead keen on undertaking bird surveys as you will realise from past blog posts. In such instances, I have been known to offer up occasional snippets of useless useful information on one’s bird communities on people’s landholdings from time to time as well. Here I will kick off with some basic conservation approaches which might work on your farm, country garden or local park or wherever you might reside. Two bird species starting with the letter B. The currently thankfully common Blackbird and our somewhat rarer Amber-listed Bullfinch.

 

Blackbird conservation guidelines from Tony William Powell and naturestimeline

 

What you looking at! So says, Mr Blackbird (Turdus merula)

 

  • It is widely accepted, when hedges are left to bear fruit or seeds, they benefit a number of species, the Blackbird being one of them. Of course, this requires a minimum of a two-three year management plan in which time, the hedges are unmanaged, although the dense cover potentially arising from this is a crucial ingredient in bird survival rates. Admittedly, inaccessible field and hedge boundaries do produce a larder for wintering birds and other wildlife. Blackbirds are especially tied to hedgerows for nesting in and according to BWPi**, their primary food types are insects and earthworms. By boosting the in-field soil structure, so that it produces more organic matter, which in turn provides higher earthworm densities are also likely to assist the Blackbird populations, longer-term.

 

Bullfinch conservation guidelines from Tony William Powell and naturestimeline

 

An Amber-listed species of conservation concern, a first-year Bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula)

 

  • Currently, Amber-listed, the Bullfinch is particularly vulnerable to food source limitations and never likes to feed far from cover. Fruit tree seeds and other weed seeds feature heavily in their diets, and they are particularly fond of the keys on the Ash, which is sadly now increasingly threatened by disease. A tall and dense hedgerow in which to nest is a critical component in Bullfinch breeding cycles, and they are especially fond of hawthorn and blackthorn. The Bullfinch normally avoids contact with people, so a lack of disturbance seems integral to its successful breeding attempts.

 

 

Never be afraid to contact me off page should you wish to know more about my services or more generally, my obsession for protecting and enhancing the bird and other wildlife communities of the United Kingdom.

 

Best Wishes and until next time.

Tony

 

As ever, you can continue to access my Facebook updates by clicking on the Red Admiral butterfly icon below.

naturestimeline Education services – “A conservation professional sharing his personal perspective on breaking news stories from the world of nature alongside his own accounts from the field.”

and

 

* could be deemed as my patch as well when time permits

** as published by Birdguides, the Birds of the Western Palearctic interactive

Another core business objective – Developing the brand on Social Media

To a Social Media Marketer or person trained in SEO and other Social Media activities, brand building, content management and publishing comes as part of their day job. As for myself, an individual one-person entity, I have to do all of the above with limited funds and resources. In fact, so far I’ve tended to do this alone, learning or making mistakes as I go, which is nothing new to me as I’m largely self-taught in everything I undertake. I will check up on the consistency of what I want my brand and blog pages to promote, on a monthly basis. In fact, today I did just that by analysing my insights on my various Social Media platforms. The following excerpt being taken from my Facebook page.

“Having just gone through my latest monthly insights and as a result of my broader social media analyses, I am pleased to confirm the consistent growth of both my pages here at naturestimeline and naturestimeline.StandUp4Nature. I am not currently in a financial position and moreover do not view it as a viable option right now, to partake in any paid advertisement of my pages. The progress of brand “naturestimeline” is truly only possible with you, my followers engaging with me and by your “word of mouth” exposure to other interested parties. Nonetheless, as I expand brand exposure and ultimate achieve more business opportunities, I may eventually consider the prospect of paid advertising. As my audience grows, those of you reading this become all the more important to me, so do share your thoughts with me, send me ideas, provide some opportunities for general chit-chat, whatever. Below is a snapshot of just how you, my followers, have played your part in allowing me to develop naturestimeline over the past year. *to make more sense of the figures within the spreadsheet screen grab, simply expand the image to full screen. The data is courtesy of my Facebook Insights and as such, private data issued to me directly from Facebook hence I’m made the data is deliberately small.

All the best wishes and any questions, please DM me.

Tony William Powell and naturestimeline.”

 

 

social-media-channels-analysis-snapshot-for-naturestimeline-facebook-pages-november-1st-2016-image-2
Facebook Insights statistics for my pages at Naturestimeline and Naturestimeline StandUp4Nature January-November 1st 2016

 

As ever, you can access my Facebook updates by clicking on the Red Admiral butterfly icon below.

naturestimeline Education services – “A conservation professional sharing his personal perspective on breaking news stories from the world of nature alongside his own accounts from the field.”

and

Nature Blogging: Why Bother?

Another personal LinkedIn connection and another of those folk given the title of a Conservation “Young Gun” back end of last year. This post resonated with me, and I’m sure it will with many others. Why bother? Noting all that wildlife for what purpose? What good does it do in telling others about your passions as a conservationist, a blogger, a naturalist? If you enjoy what you do, then stick with your passions, life will become very boring for you the moment you give up on them. Stand Up for Nature! Over to you, James Common and Nature Blogging: Why Bother?

James Common

One of the most common questions raised whenever someone stumbles across this blog, particularly from those of a non-environmental background is: why bother? Surely it takes up too much time, provides very little in the way of a reward and is generally rather tedious. A good question actually, though one I struggle to answer on a regular basis, the issue broached equally as often by nature-lovers, many of whom appear baffled by the notion of writing about wildlife, as opposed to watching it in the field 24/7. Well, I do, in fact, spent a great deal of time watching wildlife. As well as writing about it. Though such conversations have indeed caused me to ponder, let’s say, just why I dedicate so much time to blogging about nature. And, for that matter, aspire to one day make a living from amalgamating words and wildlife.

zumwalt-prairie-writing-worksh


Nature blogging, for me, is a mode…

View original post 895 more words