Tag Archives: environment

Nature Blogging: Why Bother?

Another personal LinkedIn connection and another of those folk given the title of a Conservation “Young Gun” back end of last year. This post resonated with me, and I’m sure it will with many others. Why bother? Noting all that wildlife for what purpose? What good does it do in telling others about your passions as a conservationist, a blogger, a naturalist? If you enjoy what you do, then stick with your passions, life will become very boring for you the moment you give up on them. Stand Up for Nature! Over to you, James Common and Nature Blogging: Why Bother?

James Common

One of the most common questions raised whenever someone stumbles across this blog, particularly from those of a non-environmental background is: why bother? Surely it takes up too much time, provides very little in the way of a reward and is generally rather tedious. A good question actually, though one I struggle to answer on a regular basis, the issue broached equally as often by nature-lovers, many of whom appear baffled by the notion of writing about wildlife, as opposed to watching it in the field 24/7. Well, I do, in fact, spent a great deal of time watching wildlife. As well as writing about it. Though such conversations have indeed caused me to ponder, let’s say, just why I dedicate so much time to blogging about nature. And, for that matter, aspire to one day make a living from amalgamating words and wildlife.

zumwalt-prairie-writing-worksh


Nature blogging, for me, is a mode…

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Moving towards a better future for our wildlife

Occasionally there comes a time to reflect on past knowledge of a subject and then to test it further as new evidence comes to light, some months or years later. I’m not having a Google “Right to be forgotten” moment, but it could be suggested that most people will on occasion, make a judgement quite naturally or unnaturally with or without intent and then upon reflection, realise they were misguided on a certain topic. This would of course simply be human nature and I guess we all need to accept this fact as new thoughts and ideas come to the fore. We are often told to assess the past, in order guide our future prospects. At risk of rambling, where exactly am I going with all this?

Well, could it be that these same thought processes, applied to our relationships, career prospects, friendships etc. might actually also apply in a debate about nature conservation? If I also put it to you, that our country’s wildlife future is in your hands, could you as an individual truly make a difference?

Let me now remind you of two naturestimeline postings from a year ago (click on the links to access original content) which once again poses the age old question of how best to conserve this nation’s wildlife.

Do we need a change of direction?

Or perhaps a new holistic approach to effective conservation practice?

 

So with yet still unanswered questions and *in light of many of the latest incentives coming out of the scientific community approach to nature conservation, are we now making the right kind of progress for our non-human inhabitants of this good earth at last?

naturestimeline Media/News/Publishing “A conservation professional sharing his personal perspective on breaking news stories from the world of nature alongside his own accounts from the field.”

*https://www.facebook.com/naturestimeline/posts/697195477005565, http://www.gwct.org.uk/news/news/2014/may/20140516/, http://butterfly-conservation.org/48-5124/relief-road-proves-butterfly-hit-.html

#conservation

#education

#wildlife

#science

#society

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Observations about and from Nature

There are certain things which make me tick when it comes to following events from the Natural World. One is the enjoyment of being out in the wider countryside or even in the garden and observing nature in the raw. After all, I am a keen tracker of natural phenomena and how they interact under specific climatic conditions over a number of years (phenology). A few recent highlights are shown below.

These were captured on 29th December, some 14 days ahead of the long-term average.

Woodland Snowdrops (Galanthus_nivalis‎) – These were captured on 29th December, some 14 days ahead of the long-term average.

These were captured on 15th January, a day after they were first witnessed in bloom, some 3 days behind the long-term average.

Winter Aconite (Eranthis hyemalis) – These were captured on 15th January, a day after they were first witnessed in bloom, some 3 days behind the long-term average.

The not so rare, in fact annual sighting of wintering Blackcaps in our garden, a male has since joined her.

Blackcap (Sylvia atricapilla) – The not so rare, in fact annual sighting of wintering Blackcaps in our garden, a male has since joined her.

The above sightings represent just a tiny fraction of recent phenology events. Another topic which enthuses me is how we can all learn from other’s tales from the world of nature conservation and even its politics. Much of this information can be gleaned from online sources and below I will share with you some of my personal favourites. *in each circumstance, if you hover over said link before clicking, it will reveal the owner of the blog

http://anewnatureblog.wordpress.com/about/

http://gailqb.wordpress.com/

http://ecologyescapades.com/about-me/

http://biodiversitygatwick.blogspot.co.uk/

http://manuelinor.wordpress.com/about/

http://solitaryecology.com/about/

http://writingfornature.wordpress.com/

http://freshfromthefield.blogspot.co.uk/p/about.html

These are simply a select few and I will have to revisit this post in future and bring your attention to the many other hard-working ecologists and conservationists or put simply nature lovers that are out there for us all to discover, go follow them!

What I find fascinating about us conservationists, is the fact that we won’t always see “eye to eye” on matters pertaining to effective nature conservation, in spite of this we all share one united passion. We care, we each possess amazing knowledge of our core subjects and we have an unrivalled will to succeed for the creatures with no tongue or voice with which they could communicate their story. Back to us, what’s your story? Please tell.

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