Tag Archives: spring

You never stop learning!

You never stop learning, well I also never stop undertaking my own research or following that of others. This post is a very brief one and perhaps I should entitle it “The research continues”.

Below is a replicated screen grab of my 2400th uploaded Evernote note as uploaded into Trello. I simply thought I would share it with you.


Evernote note number 2400 uploaded onto Trello


Not much blogging of late as I’ve been otherwise engaged in my freelancing activities. However, I’m always on the search for more work so please get in touch if I can help your business out in any way. For instance, I’m currently engaged in a few bird surveying projects in Southern and Central parts of the UK but I’m always on the look out for more.

Speaking of which, let’s have some record shots of some of those young birds which might just be in your backyard at the current time.


A recently fledged Robin (Erithacus rubecula)


A juvenile Blackbird (Turdus merula)


A group of partially hidden juvenile Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)


Juvenile Starlings in the Birdbath


As ever, I’d also be eternally grateful if you could kindly support my pages on Facebook, where I can be found under the name of naturestimeline and naturestimeline StandUp4Nature.



naturestimeline Education services – “A conservation professional sharing his personal perspective on breaking news stories from the world of nature alongside his own accounts from the field.”


A traditional UK spring season, but with a twist

As we are meteorologically speaking, now in the season of summer, let us look back at spring 2012. On reflection, do you feel it was a pleasant one, weather wise for the United Kingdom? As ever, courtesy of my Davis weather station, I can add some meat to the bones to my previous question.

Spring 2012 (March-May) was at its traditional best overall, although with a notable exception here and there. Look at the following plot for a closer view of Newbury, Berkshire’s Maximum Temperatures and Rainfall amounts.




From the above, it becomes apparent that 2012 proved a mixed bag. Indeed, the local climate changed abruptly on occasions. Take for example, the March rainfall deficit of 29.2mm when compared to the 30-year local average of 50mm. All the talk in the media at this stage was of impending drought and hosepipe bans. However, as most will be aware, April changed all that. Some of this, at least at a local level dramatically changed with a huge surplus of 61mm by the end of the month. May then ended up drier than usual with a deficit of 14.3mm when compared to the local 30-year average. What about the temperatures I hear you ask!

For your information, the 30-year mean temperature averages (Oxford 1971-2000) are as follows. March normally returns 6.3c, April 8.1c and May 11.3c with regard to expected temperatures. Please bear in mind, the figures shown in the above plot only show our achieved maximum temperatures. When mentioning the aforementioned averages, the weather station automatically calculates these against mean minimums and maximums so I don’t have to do the mathematics. Using the plot above you can now analyse the 2012 spring season further with regard to its temperature. 

March, with a very warm finish ended 1.6c above the mean. April abruptly turned the warmth to cold with a temperature return 0.8c below the mean. Finally, May 2012 warmed up, especially in the final third to return a local mean, 1.2c above the norm. I attach a final summary below confirming the above figures.



As for the effect on phenology, further news will be forthcoming.

Kind Regards

Tony Powell

Shock horror, a cool showery April for a change

No, you did not imagine it, it has been miserable for far too long so I haven’t ventured out much. This is partly the reason for my lack of posts, alongside a busier working life. More news to come, honest!

Tony Powell

Official blog of the Met Office news team

These are early figures covering 1 – 25 of April and not full month statistics, so are therefore very likely to change. Especially regarding ranking. Full month figures will not be available until provisionally Wednesday 2 May.

Figures for 1 – 25 April show the month so far has seen well above average rainfall across the UK, with 97 mm of rain recorded – this is 139% of the long-term monthly average (1971-2000). The wettest April in the records dating back to 1910 was 2000 which saw 120.3 mm of rain.

Currently the month is the 9th wettest April for the UK in the records. However, it’s not possible to say where the month will end up in the records until all the figures are in at the end of the month – especially as we are expecting heavy rain on Sunday.

Some areas have seen significant rainfall amounts with some parts of the…

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