A change of direction

Followers of this blog are aware my passion for Natural History “knows no bounds”, many other blogs, several of which are listed on My Favourite Blogs section, also share this overwhelming desire. However, since the inception of both naturestimeline and UKbirdingtimeline, my professional career has also evolved, as has my quest for knowledge on the State of Nature. See what I did there? Anyway, below I outline some of the changes you will notice as I intend to develop these pages.

Naturestimeline and UKbirdingtimeline will broadly stick to its original principles. However, I aim to make the place more engaging, scientific, informative and above all else, entertaining. As anyone who follows my Facebook page will know, I like to be kept “in the loop”, the place acts like a kind of newsfeed. So much so, that when it comes to the Natural World, I care, because you care!

Let’s bring impassioned debate on conservation and environmental issues to the table. Please interact and share your thoughts on how you would like to see the blog develop, it’s mine as much as it’s yours, the readers. What do you care about? Do you work in conservation? What kind of future do you think the UK’s and the wider world’s wildlife faces?

*I have no shortage of ideas myself, more about these in time. There is no hiding place, so Bee kind and we can bee in this together.

No hiding place
No hiding place


naturestimeline – courtesy of Tony William Powell on Google+

9 thoughts on “A change of direction

  1. Hi Tony,
    I like your plans for natures timeline and look forward to seeing them develop. We need more impassioned debate in schools, in the media and in politics, if the ‘progress at any cost’ juggernaut is to be stopped. If I can think of anything I’ll let you know.
    Thank you for adding my blog to your favourites. I’ll try and keep it interesting.
    Peter

  2. How about a philosophical debate? “Conservation: benefiting the environment, or easing our conscience?” or “Cost verses Outcome: Can captive breeding programmes work in the long-term?

    Those were two that popped up during university lectures a few years ago, and they turned into really interesting discussions.

    1. Rachel,

      Thanks for your input. In making everyone conservation aware, alongside a bottom-up approach, will improve the environment and in turn, ease all our consciences. Any costs involved, including government grants and the like will work in the long-term. As to your comment on captive breeding, where it works and works well, it has to better than doing nothing. A lot of experimental work (scientific type) will however bring up certain moral issues, but personally, as we are failing nature, once again, doing nothing cannot be an option.

  3. Thank you for stopping by and the like! I am looking forward to reading whatever you are writing about currently

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