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Join the green recovery! Become a conservationist in 2021

Go for it. Make 2021 your year. Your future is in your grasp. A blog from a fellow connection of mine, Charlotte Rixon.

Little Wild Tales

avenue stretching to the horizon
Credit: Chilli Charlie, Unsplash

Have you always dreamt of working in wildlife conservation, but don’t know where to start? Do you feel stuck in an unfulfilling job but worry that it is too late to switch careers into conservation?

2020 was a turbulent year for everyone – but it did bring some good news. Lockdowns and social distancing restrictions gave many people the chance to reconnect with nature – and nature the chance to recover from some of the damage we are inflicting on it. We’re waking up to a new era in 2021, with vaccines being rolled-out more widely, and momentum growing across the world for a green recovery.

What part do you want to play in the green recovery? No matter your age, background or career stage, if you have a passion for nature and wildlife then you could become a professional conservationist. Thankfully, there is some great…

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7 thoughts on “Join the green recovery! Become a conservationist in 2021

    1. I firmly believe our species can still be a force for good, given the willpower and all the right tools in the conservation toolbox, in bringing about these recoveries.

  1. As a farmer/rancher, i’m an avid conservationist, and although i’ve been labeled a tree hugger, i am not since the reality is there must be balance between human comfort and nature’s ability to amply provide. Sadly, the government is often the catalyst in the middle picking winners and losers by skewing markets, funding programs which encourage bad behavior, and promoting false information. So we do the best we can without going broke and if real tree huggers (extreme environmentalists) could come down off their high horses, we’d be more likely to affect the biblical mandate of guarding and keeping the garden.

    1. Nothing wrong with being a tree hugger. And as I work regularly with farmers and other land managers as part of my job role, I can see where you’re coming from with your insights. Thanks for commenting, @Tannachton Farm.

        1. As a member of the UK conservation charity, the Woodland Trust, I couldn’t possibly state otherwise. Again, even then, the surge in interest for woodland plantings globally shouldn’t mean we drive our farmers off the land. Whilst doing so, we’d likely kill off the remaining ground-nesting bird species which are dependent upon you folks conserving and enhancing the habitats for them. The right tree in the right place, for sure. Who’s Noah Webster anyway? I best Google it.

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