Encouraging better care of the environment

Newbury Weekly News article scan 20/04/17 – Country Matters (Andrew Davis) – Click on the image for a better close-up.

A number of my clients, in fact, the vast majority can probably be classed as Stewards of the landscape. The scanned copy headline as taken from my local newspaper, the Newbury Weekly News back on April 20th this year, talks about an uncertain future for farming post-Brexit but from somewhat of a positive viewpoint (pleasing to see). More broadly, it speaks of what Brexit might mean for the Agricultural sector and its subsequent management (i.e. environmental stewardship) of the UK countryside as a whole. Collaborative approaches such as river catchment conservation projects, farmer clusters and farming/science-led directives will all help guide our way in future and I’m sure will be getting deservedly media attention as a result. The article replicated below taken from the very same newspaper cutting is from Nicola Chester and speaks of the yearly differences she witnesses on her patch (North Wessex Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty*) and the need to assess such changes.

 

Newbury Weekly News article scan 20/04/17 – NATURE NOTES (Nicola Chester) – Click on the image for a better close-up.

 

Speaking of assessments or continual monitoring as we should perhaps name it, I am dead keen on undertaking bird surveys as you will realise from past blog posts. In such instances, I have been known to offer up occasional snippets of useless useful information on one’s bird communities on people’s landholdings from time to time as well. Here I will kick off with some basic conservation approaches which might work on your farm, country garden or local park or wherever you might reside. Two bird species starting with the letter B. The currently thankfully common Blackbird and our somewhat rarer Amber-listed Bullfinch.

 

Blackbird conservation guidelines from Tony William Powell and naturestimeline

 

What you looking at! So says, Mr Blackbird (Turdus merula)

 

  • It is widely accepted, when hedges are left to bear fruit or seeds, they benefit a number of species, the Blackbird being one of them. Of course, this requires a minimum of a two-three year management plan in which time, the hedges are unmanaged, although the dense cover potentially arising from this is a crucial ingredient in bird survival rates. Admittedly, inaccessible field and hedge boundaries do produce a larder for wintering birds and other wildlife. Blackbirds are especially tied to hedgerows for nesting in and according to BWPi**, their primary food types are insects and earthworms. By boosting the in-field soil structure, so that it produces more organic matter, which in turn provides higher earthworm densities are also likely to assist the Blackbird populations, longer-term.

 

Bullfinch conservation guidelines from Tony William Powell and naturestimeline

 

An Amber-listed species of conservation concern, a first-year Bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula)

 

  • Currently, Amber-listed, the Bullfinch is particularly vulnerable to food source limitations and never likes to feed far from cover. Fruit tree seeds and other weed seeds feature heavily in their diets, and they are particularly fond of the keys on the Ash, which is sadly now increasingly threatened by disease. A tall and dense hedgerow in which to nest is a critical component in Bullfinch breeding cycles, and they are especially fond of hawthorn and blackthorn. The Bullfinch normally avoids contact with people, so a lack of disturbance seems integral to its successful breeding attempts.

 

 

Never be afraid to contact me off page should you wish to know more about my services or more generally, my obsession for protecting and enhancing the bird and other wildlife communities of the United Kingdom.

 

Best Wishes and until next time.

Tony

 

As ever, you can continue to access my Facebook updates by clicking on the Red Admiral butterfly icon below.

naturestimeline Education services – “A conservation professional sharing his personal perspective on breaking news stories from the world of nature alongside his own accounts from the field.”

and

 

* could be deemed as my patch as well when time permits

** as published by Birdguides, the Birds of the Western Palearctic interactive

One of naturestimeline’s core business objectives – Freelancing

A quick blog of perhaps several to highlight where and how I intend naturestimeline to develop over the coming months and years from a business sense and also from an educational viewpoint.

My working background

Freelance Professional – Short-term contract worker offering Bird Surveys/Desk Research/Work from Home Office services

 

Visiting Researcher and professional Ornithologist/Field Surveyor

 

Undertake ad hoc visits to clients who need any of the following tasks completed in relation to assessing the natural environment.

 

  • Have the ability to detect the presence of any birds and other wildlife residing on their land. I am well known for my skills in identifying birds through their calls and songs. I have been practising natural sound recordings for more than 25 years.

 

  • Provide an evidence base comprised of abundance and distribution of all bird species and or other wildlife making use of their land. I have been undertaking such studies for many years both in a voluntary capacity and in paid positions for repeat clients since 2014. 

 

  • Visit as many times as deemed necessary and provide datasets which gather enough information to provide an excellent evidence base. The landowner can then choose whether he or she acts on produced evidence to enhance his or her landholdings for the wildlife.

 

  • Provide a detailed systematic analysis of my findings via spreadsheets and associated reporting services. Examples can be made available through direct contact via my Facebook details or email.

 

  • Where appropriate, in my own time, I will also input these findings onto the British Trust for Ornithology’s BirdTrack system. In doing this, I hopefully provide the BTO research scientists with further evidence to add to their existing knowledge base which they can act on in the name of conservation.

 

 

See you next time.

 

Best Wishes

Tony Powell

 

 

 

 

naturestimeline Education services – “A conservation professional sharing his personal perspective on breaking news stories from the world of nature alongside his own accounts from the field.”

and

You never stop learning!

You never stop learning, well I also never stop undertaking my own research or following that of others. This post is a very brief one and perhaps I should entitle it “The research continues”.

Below is a replicated screen grab of my 2400th uploaded Evernote note as uploaded into Trello. I simply thought I would share it with you.

 

Evernote note number 2400 uploaded onto Trello

 

Not much blogging of late as I’ve been otherwise engaged in my freelancing activities. However, I’m always on the search for more work so please get in touch if I can help your business out in any way. For instance, I’m currently engaged in a few bird surveying projects in Southern and Central parts of the UK but I’m always on the look out for more.

Speaking of which, let’s have some record shots of some of those young birds which might just be in your backyard at the current time.

P1000031
A recently fledged Robin (Erithacus rubecula)
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A juvenile Blackbird (Turdus merula)
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A group of partially hidden juvenile Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)
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Juvenile Starlings in the Birdbath

 

As ever, I’d also be eternally grateful if you could kindly support my pages on Facebook, where I can be found under the name of naturestimeline and naturestimeline StandUp4Nature.

 

 

naturestimeline Education services – “A conservation professional sharing his personal perspective on breaking news stories from the world of nature alongside his own accounts from the field.”

and