Tag Archives: birds

You never stop learning!

You never stop learning, well I also never stop undertaking my own research or following that of others. This post is a very brief one and perhaps I should entitle it “The research continues”.

Below is a replicated screen grab of my 2400th uploaded Evernote note as uploaded into Trello. I simply thought I would share it with you.

 

Evernote note number 2400 uploaded onto Trello

 

Not much blogging of late as I’ve been otherwise engaged in my freelancing activities. However, I’m always on the search for more work so please get in touch if I can help your business out in any way. For instance, I’m currently engaged in a few bird surveying projects in Southern and Central parts of the UK but I’m always on the look out for more.

Speaking of which, let’s have some record shots of some of those young birds which might just be in your backyard at the current time.

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A recently fledged Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

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A juvenile Blackbird (Turdus merula)

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A group of partially hidden juvenile Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)

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Juvenile Starlings in the Birdbath

 

As ever, I’d also be eternally grateful if you could kindly support my pages on Facebook, where I can be found under the name of naturestimeline and naturestimeline StandUp4Nature.

 

 

naturestimeline Education services – “A conservation professional sharing his personal perspective on breaking news stories from the world of nature alongside his own accounts from the field.”

and

Ongoing Research – slowly building up the knowledge base!

For those who might have missed this, I’ll reblog this article here. On my way to fulfilling my mission statement. “birding through the seasons, why birds matter and how to conserve them”.

UKbirdingtimeline

As of this afternoon, I have completed a first stage of many by documenting my scanned (poorly) handwritten notes for a personal research project I have in mind. An example from one of the 184 notes I have uploaded in recent days is shown below.

*be prepared for a geek moment

Doxie 0240 example - Yellow Wagtail 1 Doxie scanned example of handwritten notes – Yellow Wagtail 1

I have also tagged them within Evernote with various wordings for later referencing. For those of you who don’t know what Evernote is, it is a digital note-taking software package and is available with both offline and online versions. Below is an example screen grab of my current Evernote setup for the purposes of this Bird Research Project.

Evernote setup screen grab example - Yellow Wagtail 1 Evernote setup screen grab example – Yellow Wagtail 1

I may eventually try to find a way of incorporating this growing evidence base of notes of viable conservation measures onto 

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From autumn to spring in December 1806

December 2015 is most definitely an odd one. With its weather statistics and Natural World tales, it is certainly becoming one for the history books. Although, it is worth noting that we have been here before, as this example from 1806 shows, courtesy of the wonderful Wanstead Meteo blog. Of course, my current mean Temperatures of 5.4c above average could and perhaps should still be viewed as rather concerning.

Wanstead Meteo

When I was writing up my winter forecast I came across an analogue that was very similar to what seems to be unfolding this December.

The River Lea close to where Luke Howard's laboratory stood by wanstead_meteo The River Lea close to where Luke Howard’s laboratory stood

Luke Howard, in his first volume of The Climate of London, describes a very warm December that followed on from a warm November that fooled flora and fauna into thinking spring had begun early.

Howard’s statistics are very high: a November mean of 9.5C while December was 9.3C. CET that November was 2.3C above average while December was 3.3C above average. A slightly wetter than average was followed by a very wet December – over 250% the monthly average caused the River Lea to burst its banks in several places

“The catkins of the filberts expanded prematurely. On December 25th a hedge sparrow’s nest was taken at Doveridge, Derbyshire, with four eggs and…

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